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Books: Enlightened Sexism

January 20, 2011 | Books,Feminism,Jennifer Pozner,Joan Williams,Media literacy,Susan Douglas

I recently read Enlightened Sexism: The Seductive Message that Feminism’s Work Is Done (Kindle edition) by Susan J. Douglas. It was perfectly sandwiched between Reshaping the Work-Family Debate by Joan Williams and Reality Bites Back by Jennifer Pozner. If these three women don’t know each other, they should. Susan? Joan and Jennifer. Joan and Jennifer? Susan. I’d love to invite you all to have coffee and start that conversation Joan talked about in her book. I’ve got a few other people I’d like to invite, too.

Anyway.

I adore Susan Douglas. I read her book, The Mommy Myth, five years ago. I laughed out loud. I cried. I seethed. And I did all those things again with Enlightened Sexism.

I highlighted a ton of quotes, all of which I could share here. But you know what? I’m so far behind on everything. This has been hanging out in my drafts folder for a couple of months. The simplest thing for me to say is that I highly recommend this book. I highly recommend anything Susan Douglas writes.

Posted by Becky @ 9:15 am | 2 Comments  

Books: I Went to the Animal Fair

December 7, 2010 | Books

I just finished reading I Went to the Animal Fair: A Journey Through Madness to Meaning by Heather Harpham. I don’t remember buying or even being interested in this book. I found it when I was stacking books on the shelves of my new library. It was only 159 pages, so it didn’t take long to read.

I seem to be picking books written by people who have gone through recent challenges. Hmm.

I wrote this book over the course of a painful year. It is not a book about moralizing, or about right or wrong. It is about waking up to discover what is real and true — no matter how painful that process. It’s about breaking through layers of suffocating denial. It is about a terrible revelation. (p. 9)

It had an odd, quirky feel to it — probably because the words came from her journal entries.

This is the best observation in the whole book.

I realized about a month ago that there’s a last time everyone skips across a street. And that most people I know have already skipped for the last time and don’t know it.

From here on out it will always be walking or running, growing older and buying things at the store or seeing friends or going to work, but never again will life impel them to skip. When I thought of this, the tragedy of it overwhelmed me so that I skipped all the way home from my friend’s house.

Skipping is a strange thing. Because it means something. Like trains make the sound of leaving. Skipping is the motion of being totally free, childlike, abandoned of self and to self.

But I learned something else about skipping. You can’t fake it. Or make it happen. It must be something that happens to you. (pp. 152-153)

I’ll think of that next time I’m marveling at all the children skipping through the halls at the elementary school. It truly is a joy to watch.

Posted by Becky @ 6:00 am | 2 Comments  

Movies: Miss Representation

December 6, 2010 | Movies

I’m looking forward to seeing this. It’s scheduled to premiere at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival in January. Find out more at Miss REPRESENTATION.

The site has a list of “suggested reading” books, to which I add:

  • Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale
  • Joanne Bamberger: PunditMom’s Mothers of Intention: How Women & Social Media Are Revolutionizing Politics in America
  • Ann Crittenden: The Price of Motherhood: Why the Most Important Job in the World Is Still the Least Valued and If You’ve Raised Kids, You Can Manage Anything
  • Susan J. Douglas (and Meredith W. Michaels): Enlightened Sexism: The Seductive Message that Feminism’s Work Is Done, The Mommy Myth: The Idealization of Motherhood and How It Has Undermined All Women and Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female with the Mass Media
  • Barbara Ehrenreich: Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America and Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream
  • Gloria Feldt: No Excuses: 9 Ways Women Can Change How We Think about Power
  • Sharon Lerner: The War on Moms: On Life in a Family-Unfriendly Nation
  • Carolyn B. Maloney: Rumors of our Progress have been Greatly Exaggerated: Why Women’s Lives Aren’t Getting any Easier and How We Can Make Real Progress for Ourselves and Our Daughters
  • Devra Renner and Aviva Pflock: Mommy Guilt: Learn to Worry Less, Focus on What Matters Most, and Raise Happier Kids
  • Joan C. Williams: Reshaping the Work-Family Debate: Why Men and Class Matter and Unbending Gender: Why Family and Work Conflict and What to Do About It
  • Posted by Becky @ 6:00 am | 1 Comment  

    Books: Reshaping the Work-Family Debate

    December 5, 2010 | Books,Devra Renner,Economics,Education,Ethics,Family,Getting sick,Journalism,Leslie Bennetts,Linda Hirshman,Motherhood,Norway,Parenting,Politics,PR,Research,Sarah Palin,U.S. government,Vacation,Work,Working Mother

    “Writ small, this book is about reframing debates about work and family. … Writ large, this book is about reframing American politics. Work-family issues have not been placed at the center of an analysis of U.S. politics, but it is time to rethink the assumption that they do not belong there.”

    Wow. Joan C. Williams knows how to start off a book. She knows how to end it and fill the middle, too. But I’ll let you find that out by reading Reshaping the Work-Family Debate: Why Men and Class Matter. (I highly recommend reading it. Williams is brilliant.)

    It’s what she said in a Wilson Center discussion with Barbara Ehrenreich in September, though, that really gets to the heart of the matter of this book:

    Litigation has accomplished a lot, but federal employment law cannot give us social subsidies or workers’ rights. The only way we can get those things is through legislation. The only way we can get that legislation is by very significantly shifting the political culture in the United States.

    The only way to shift the political culture is to start a national conversation about gender pressures on men, she said. Until we do that, we won’t see much progress for women.

    Devra Renner and Aviva Pflock, authors of Mommy Guilt, will understand this book. Even though their book is about mothers, most of the work they do is about parenting. They spend a lot of time reminding others that parenting is something both mothers and fathers do.

    Statistics show that both mothers and fathers in the United States feel the scales overwhelmingly tip in favor of work and short-change their family lives.

    When asked, American parents — 90% of American mothers and 95% of American fathers — say that they wish they had more time with their children. These levels are sharply lower in Europe. (p. 2, Introduction)

    Why are these levels lower in Europe? Because European countries structure workplaces around their workforces, recognizing that everyone has a right to a personal life.

    They have a saying in Norway, “We don’t live to work, we work to live.” It’s just the opposite in America, a Norwegian might say, as he straps his baby on his back for a mountain hike — one of many during his nine weeks of “pappa leave.” When the leave is over, he will return to his 35-hour workweek, which enables him to pick up his child from daycare in the afternoon and still have several hours of family time before bedtime. Every day.

    A Swedish father wrote a guest post for me about his experience as a parent in Sweden. He asked three years ago, regarding non-existent benefits in the United States, “… how do we change the system to make it easier to combine children, family and work?”

    He’s not the only one who’s been asking that question. Many have been asking how to get family-friendly legislation passed. Williams looks at why we haven’t been able to get it. To answer the first question, we must first have an answer to the second question.

    For one, there’s a class culture gap that polarizes employees and keeps them from coming together on specific issues.

    For another — and Williams doesn’t discuss this in her book — companies don’t want legislation. They want to handle “family-friendly benefits” on their own. That means offering very little with a big splash of advertising and PR to make some magazine’s “best companies” list.

    In reality, most companies on that list don’t want to offer comprehensive benefits or even one guaranteed sick day for each employee, based on lobbying efforts on their behalf by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

    As the largest lobbying organiztion in the United States, the Chamber spent $91.7 million on lobbying in 2008 and $144.5 million in 2009. It — along with the companies it respresents — opposes any efforts to expand Family and Medical Leave Act leave or to mandate paid sick leave. It opposed a bill that would give employees seven paid sick days a year. It opposed SCHIP (State Children’s Health Insurance Program) and the Employee Free Choice Act. It aggressively opposes union-backed proposals to increase minimum wage.

    Some of these “listed” companies are multinational corporations with offices not only in the United States but also in Norway and Sweden. Benefits for white-collar American workers at these companies might be better than most: six weeks of paid maternity leave (and maybe up to a week of paternity leave for fathers), lactation rooms and maybe they can even buy vacation time. (Yes, that was touted as a “benefit.”)

    Their employees in Norway and Sweden, however, get paid family leave of one to three years, the option of part-time work, shorter workweeks, paid sick leave and paid vacation. Why? Because all of that is legally required in those countries.

    In Europe, … paid leaves are financed through social insurance, which leaves European employers more competitive than U.S. employers, for two reasons. First, European businesses do not have to pay the steep 30% ‘benefits load’ — the cost of a benefits package as a percentage of a worker’s salary — that many U.S. businesses pay. Second, because European employers are not responsible for covering the cost of paid leave themselves, they can afford to replace the worker on leave. In contrast, when U.S. employers pay the wages of workers on leave, often they simply heap leave-takers’ responsibilities onto their remaining workers, with no compensating increase in pay. This practice fuels workplace resentment. (p. 35)

    In the United States, “The notion that having a child is a private frolic that does not deserve community support is implausible. There is no reason to expect that society should be able to privatize the costs of raising the next generation of citizens — from which all society will benefit — onto the backs of the women who bear them. This habit impoverishes women economically and men emotionally.” (p. 107)

    Williams finally, finally, finally asks (and answers) the same question I’ve been asking for years. It’s not, “What’s wrong with women?” as Leslie Bennetts, Linda Hirshman and several others have asked. It’s, “What’s wrong with the workplace?”

    Somewhat “coming full circle,” Williams starts with Lisa Belkin’s 2003 article, The Opt-Out Revolution, and I learned about Williams’ new book from Belkin’s more recent article, Calling Mr. Mom? and blog post of the same name.

    In the first chapter, Williams expands on work she did in 2006 on a paper called “Opt Out” or Pushed Out? How the Press Covers Work/Family Conflict, The Untold Story of Why Women Leave the Workforce, which debunked the “opt-out revolution” myth perpetuated by media reports.

    Even better for me, at that time, was a journalist debunking the myth — which had been perpetuated by journalists — for an audience of journalists when E.J. Graff wrote The Opt-Out Myth essay for the Columbia Journalism Review in 2007.

    Graff explained: “Here’s why this matters: if journalism repeatedly frames the wrong problem, then the folks who make public policy may very well deliver the wrong solution. If women are happily choosing to stay home with their babies, that’s a private decision. But it’s a public policy issue if most women (and men) need to work to support their families, and if the economy needs women’s skills to remain competitive. It’s a public policy issue if schools, jobs, and other American institutions are structured in ways that make it frustratingly difficult, and sometimes impossible, for parents to manage both their jobs and family responsibilities.”

    And how are American institutions structured? With masculine workplace norms.

    … although work-family conflict traditionally is associated with women, a prime mover of work-family conflict is masculinity. Inflexible workplaces have proved so hard to change, in significant part, because of the intertwining of masculinity with work schedules and current understandings of work commitment. (p. 33)

    What do masculine workplace norms get us? No paid family leave. Long hours. Unequal pay. And motherhood as the strongest trigger for gender bias.

    As a culture, we need to stop lying to ourselves, stop pretending that the ‘choices’ thrust on us by outmoded norms are actually choices made of free will. We need to stop ignoring the fact that the available choices are dismally inadequate. (p. 40)

    I couldn’t help thinking of the movie 9 to 5 when reading this book. Didn’t Judy, Violet and Doralee take care of flexible work schedules and job sharing 30 years ago? Sure, they had to poison, hogtie and hold captive their sexist boss. But, hey, they got the job done, right?

    Well, OK. Real life is much harsher. Many employees are “one sick child away from being fired.” They are often forced to make the impossible decision to choose between work or their children. When they pick their children (because they’re sick and daycare or school won’t take them or, worse, they’re headed to the emergency room), employees are often fired.

    This is not just a working-mother issue. It affects fathers, too. Current research shows that this kind of inflexibility is not just an issue for women:

    “Roughly 55% of the arbitration that WorkLife Law studied involved men.” (p. 56)

    But it’s time to realize that the workplace is a “gender factory” constructed for “ideal workers” without family responsibilities.

    Let’s begin with pregnancy. The only reason pregnancy represents a problem for employed women is because the ideal-worker norm is designed around someone with a man’s body (no time off for childbearing) and men’s traditional life patterns (no time off for child rearing or other care work). Once again, the issue is not whether men and women are really different; the issue is why this particular difference matters in this context. As Martha Minow pointed out long ago, men are as different from women as women are from men. What gives women’s difference salience in the workplace is the weight of unstated masculine norms. (p. 129)

    “The ideal-worker standard and norm of work devotion push mothers to the margins of economic life. And a society that marginalizes its mothers impoverishes its children. That is why the paradigmatic poor family in the United States is a single mother and her child.” (p. 103) Emphasis added.

    Williams does a great job of breaking down the differences between classes and explaining the need to bridge those gaps and rebuild an alliance between progressives and “the Missing Middle.”

    “The most refined fuel for class resentments is the culture of casual insults leveled by progressives toward the white working class. Changing U.S. politics will require an embargo on such insults.” (p. 152)

    “As Theda Skocpol pointed out nearly a decade ago, progressives tend to focus so intently on poverty that they miss Americans in the middle of the income distribution. Skocpol finds it ‘puzzling’ that ‘our policy debates deal so little with the fate of working families of modest means.’ She recommended ‘a new family-oriented populism’ that offers supoprt for working families on the type that exists in Europe, namely, universal programs, rather than means-tested programs that are limited to the poor. Her analysis has been largely ignored.” (p. 161)

    Maybe it’s time to stop ignoring this.

    Williams challenges cultural fantasies about feminism (especially Sarah Palin‘s version of it — the five pages she spends deconstructing Palin alone is worth the price of the book), and she says she wants to start a national conversation about gender issues.

    A conversation.

    Is that enough? Who participates? Then what?

    Posted by Becky @ 7:50 pm | 8 Comments  

    Books: The Faith Club

    November 7, 2010 | Books

    I finished reading (and discussing last month at book club) The Faith Club: A Muslim, A Christian, A Jew — Three Women Search for Understanding by Ranya Idliby, Suzanne Oliver and Priscilla Warner. They got together to write a children’s book about religions and accepting each other. They never did publish the children’s book. Instead, they wrote this book, which is a testament to friendship and learning.

    Posted by Becky @ 5:23 pm | Comments  

    Books: No Excuses

    October 24, 2010 | Benefits,Books,Economics,Education,Family,Gloria Feldt,Leslie Bennetts,Linda Hirshman,Motherhood,Politics,Work

    I just read No Excuses: 9 Ways Women Can Change How We Think about Power by Gloria Feldt. I bought the Kindle version.

    If I’d only read the headlines and tweets, I might have dismissed it as a (sadly familiar) scolding of “not doing feminism right.” When I saw, “Women’s roadblock to power: themselves,” I thought, wait a second. I thought I had a good sense of who Gloria Feldt was (we met in Chicago in 2009), and this doesn’t sound like that. I’d better read this book.

    It’s a great book, and I’ll tell you why.

    I just need to get a few things out of the way first.

    Feldt quotes so many inspiring people and tells the stories of amazing women. She also quotes Linda Hirshman and Leslie Bennetts, both of whom I disagree with on so many levels. Feldt may call Hirshman her “tough-love feminist friend,” but to many, Hirshman is a bully. Bennetts says she’s simply the messenger, but it’s actually her “message” that’s flawed. Her heart may be in the right place, but her supporting evidence isn’t.

    Feldt takes a couple of surface swipes at women who “opt out” of the workplace. They should just “cut it out” because, you know, she and other feminists of her generation didn’t work their butts off so these youngsters could just sit on theirs. (My words, not hers.)

    Looking at the issues we face as women through a completely individualistic lens presents us with a problem, or maybe it’s just an excuse. I liken it to the so-called choice feminists who say that what the women’s movement fought for was solely to give them options, and every option, including opting out of the workforce or total indifference to politics, is equally valid. It’s individualism dressed up as feminism. (Location 2082, Kindle edition)

    It’s just not that simple. Women get fired because of pregnancy and lactation, others are pushed out for other reasons. Many women don’t want to “opt out” and wouldn’t if they had more rights. For example, lactation wouldn’t even be a work issue if women had guaranteed, paid family leave. But they don’t. So they get lactation rooms. If they’re lucky. Most get nothing.

    I do, however, agree with her advice to work together on these issues, especially considering the standing advice is to “negotiate individually with your boss.” That’s fine, until your boss takes another job and you’re left with a boss who refuses to (and isn’t required to) honor your previous agreement. Or maybe your company will have layoffs, and you (with the flextime or on maternity leave) will probably be the first to go.

    When you’re up against a work-life balance problem that requires changing a long-used process — perhaps you’re trying to change a policy like creating flextime, ensuring sick leave, or getting more women onto the executive team — you can, to a limited extent, improve your situation independently of others by negotiating your own terms of employment. But that won’t alter the underlying structure that perpetuates the problem. If you want to change the system, you need to function like a movement. (Location 3719, Kindle edition)

    When all choices are framed as radically individual ones, not only are women less likely to perceive their own power to determine the course of their lives and the quality of others’ lives, but they are also less likely to seek the recourse and strength that can be found in a collective movement united in Sister Courage. (Location 5093, Kindle edition)

    At one point, Feldt talked about a meeting where she asked a room full of university professionals why men earn more money.

    “Because they ask for it!” they said.

    No, they don’t. Money falls in their laps like manna from heaven. OK. Sweeping generalization alert! (As in, “they [all] ask for it!”) But I’d bet a lot of them don’t. They’re rewarded with more money because the guys they work for figure they deserve it. (Another generalization alert!)

    So, let me get specific.

    My husband and I graduated from college at the same time from the same university. We had different majors and worked in different industries, but we earned the same salary in our first jobs out. In less than five years, his salary was more than double mine. He never once asked for more money or a raise. I, on the other hand, spoke up often. About everything. I was told no or shown the hoops that I should jump through before I would get what I requested, whether it was more money, the proper equipment to do my job or getting a sexist boss to treat me fairly. (I ended up leaving that job, and he stayed on for several more years, probably getting raises he never had to request.)

    I once applied and interviewed for a job when I was working another. They were interested until it came to money. They choked on my salary requirement and asked what I earned in the job I had. I told them. I was better off staying where I was, they told me (and I was already earning less than half my husband’s salary).

    So, while my husband was offered more money at every new job he considered, I was always offered less. Just a few years ago, I finagled an interview for a management position, which was really five jobs squeezed into one. When I asked about salary, it was all I could do to not fall out of my chair. That wasn’t a living wage for one person, let alone a family of five. If I hadn’t bitten my tongue, the next words out of my mouth would have been, “OK. Close your eyes. Pretend I’m a man. Now what’s the salary?”

    By far the most confounding problem facing women today is not that doors aren’t open, but that women aren’t walking through the open doors in numbers and with intention sufficient to transform society’s major institutions once and for all. (Location 789, Kindle edition)

    When I started reading in No Excuses about all these wide-open doors that women should be walking through, I couldn’t help but thinking, with a side order of sarcasm …

    Oh, oh, oh! Did you get us paid maternity leave?

    *pause*

    No.

    OK. Umm. Oh, oh, oh! Did you get us equal pay?

    *pause*

    No.

    OK. Umm. What about universal child care?

    No.

    Well? Did you at least get us one guaranteed paid sick day?

    No.

    But, seriously. I’d be missing the point if that were my overall response to this book.

    This is a great book because it is overwhelmingly positive, encouraging and inclusive. It builds momentum and fosters hope. It says, “Now is the time to claim power. Let’s do it together.”

    I may not agree with every one of her assessments on why women are “stuck” where they are, but I do agree that women are stuck, and it’s best to work together to change that. As she said, this is an exciting time, “flush with the promise of transformation” and that women should embrace their “power to push the fulcrum, finally, to abundant justice and full equality so that women can at last lead unlimited lives.” (Location 5326, Kindle edition)

    How could you not get swept up in that?

    I thought it was interesting that she told the story of Joan Gerberding of Mediaguide and Mentoring and Inspiring Women in Radio because I’d recently read a book by Eric Shoars, Women Under Glass: The Secret Nature of Glass Ceilings and the Steps to Overcome Them, in which he talks about the dearth of women at the executive level in the radio industry. His advice for gaining parity for women in the radio industry was a mentorship program. While that’s a great idea, it’s far too simplistic. Feldt confirmed my thoughts by quoting Cherie Blair, “We need more than mentors. We need real structural change.” (Location 1820, Kindle edition)

    I’m good at connecting people who belong together. I’ve always wanted to gather a powerhouse panel of amazing women, but I haven’t been able to do that yet.

    You know who can? Gloria Feldt. She knows everyone from Gloria Steinem to Shelby Knox. She builds bridges instead of burning them. She builds people up instead of tearing them down. She looks for opportunity and equality at every turn.

    She wants to inspire: “There are many reasons why women have been held back or have stepped back from our power. But there are no excuses anymore. My intent is not to assign blame, but to inspire women to embrace our historic moment; not to dish up ancient history, but to envision a bright future, and to provide the tools to make it happen now while the opportunity is hot.” (Location 143, Kindle edition)

    I might just think this book was written by someone who plans to run for office. Hey, it’s happened before. I know a certain president who wrote a couple of books before he got elected.

    Is that a wide-open Oval Office door I see?

    I stood up and asked, ‘What in the world is wrong with leading?’ (Location 5308, Kindle edition)

    What indeed. What do you say, Gloria? You walking through?

    Related posts
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    Revisiting Leslie Bennetts and The Feminine Mistake
    Leslie Bennetts stars in ‘Dude, Where’s My Car?’
    Bennetts: Men shirk chores because women let them
    Revisiting Linda Hirshman
    Linda Hirshman rants about Yo Mamma
    A little less conversation, a little more action, please
    Books: Rumors of our Progress have been Greatly Exaggerated by Carolyn B. Maloney
    Working Mother works for … you?

    Posted by Becky @ 5:26 pm | 19 Comments  

    Serendipity

    October 10, 2010 | Books,Gloria Feldt

    I was at the store the other day, shopping for greeting cards. I saw this one, thought of Gloria Feldt and smiled, figuring she’d get a kick out of it. Why did I think of Gloria? I’m reading her book, No Excuses: 9 Ways Women Can Change How We Think about Power. I’m about halfway through.

    I put it with the other cards I planned to buy. It’s not as if I planned to actually send it to her. Eh, I’d find something interesting to do with it.

    When I got home, I had a few minutes to read. I’d just started chapter 7. In it, she was talking about a T-shirt with a slogan she wore. I kept reading to the next page, and there it was. She told us the slogan on shirt: “Well-behaved women seldom make history.” ~ Laurel Thatcher Ulrich.

    So? I sent her the card.

    Cheers, Gloria!

    Now, I’ve got to go finish the book. I’ll write about it here when I’m done.

    Posted by Becky @ 2:53 pm | 1 Comment  

    Books: The Optimist’s Daughter

    October 3, 2010 | Books

    I just finished reading The Optimist’s Daughter by Eudora Welty. After two years living in this town, I finally found my way to the college library. Got a card, even. And I checked out this book. It’s practically brand-spanking new, and it’s only been checked out twice before: in 1980 and in 1986. All three stamps are October. How odd. Must be the time of year for reading Eudora Welty?

    I know she won a Pulitzer for this, and I adored her book about writing, One Writer’s Beginnings, but, dang. I didn’t like this one. I’m not sure why. Wonder what the other two people who read this particular copy of the book thought of it.

    Posted by Becky @ 6:00 am | Comments  

    Books: Astrid & Veronika

    September 11, 2010 | Books

    I recently read Astrid & Veronika by Linda Olsson, a Swedish writer. I’d heard about this in Norway this summer. It’s an amazing story by an amazing author!

    Posted by Becky @ 6:00 am | Comments  

    Books: The Redbreast

    September 10, 2010 | Books

    I just finished reading The Redbreast (on Kindle) by Jo Nesbø, one of Norway’s most popular authors. He’s also a musician, and he’s from Molde. I’m not sure why I never read him before and why it’s taken me so long to get around to reading him because he’s fabulous.

    The kids and I are also reading his Doctor Proctor’s Fart Powder, which is a lot of fun.

    The only odd thing about his books would be the translations. They’re translated into British English, which, yeah, I know is different from American English. But some of the things just throw me off a bit. For example, his books never translate “gate” to “street.” Yeah, I get that it can be part of the proper name, but it’s still weird to keep thinking about gates and fences everywhere, when it’s really streets. And the children’s book is obviously set in Norway, translated to British English, but the money is dollars and cents. Try explaining all that to curious 6- and 7-year-olds. *head spinning*

    Still. LOVE this author.

    Posted by Becky @ 6:00 am | Comments  


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